Friday, January 1, 2016

Genealogy Books and a Happy New Year

It has been two months since my last post. During that time my focus has been on genealogy books. Our local society, the Genealogical Forum of Oregon, had a book sale that was irresistible. The email announcement notifying of a sale of 50% off the list price certainly caught my attention. The accessible list of books in PDF format was 41 pages. When I finally got around to looking at the list I was up most of the night. Using a copy and paste system a list of 42 books, some multiple sets, was created as a word document.

Before sending the list to the society a review of online sales of the books was made. Using mostly amazon.com to compare the prices made it clear that the prices of the society were fair and often quite reduced at 50% off.

Then a review of the list of my personal genealogy books, over 700 books, and 14 pages needed to take place. Gratefully a reorganization of my books, checking to verify they were included in the list had just taken place. In the process of moving the books had been placed on shelves randomly, but in groups of types of books. Now all the books are on the shelves in an order that matches the list and finding a book is so much easier. There were also a few books that had not been included on the list, probably acquired during the moving process. After including those books and reviewing the list once more a list of seven books not found on the shelves was made. Some of them may have been overlooked, some may have been read and given away, and others may be hiding in the six boxes of genealogy materials that need to be gone through.

Now it was time to send the list of books wanted for purchase to the society. The wonderful volunteers emailed me back providing suggested times for picking up the books. Before our arrival they gathered up the books that were still available and had three boxes ready and waiting. While there the books were looked over and reviewed once more with my list to ensure they were not ones that were already in my collection. Four books had been sold, one could not be found, one was a duplicate, two were decided against, and one was already in my collection.

One of the books that sold prior to our visit was for the Mayflower Families Five Generations Volume Six Stephen Hopkins. In discussing the book with the volunteers one disclosed that her husband purchased it for her. That revealed that we are related somewhere in the descendants of Stephen Hopkins. We could have talked genealogy all afternoon. Another interesting part of the experience was noticing a box, marked for Judy Russell, with books ready to be shipped to her. It is a small genealogy world and genealogists are always in the market for good books.

In preparing for the New Year I reviewed my blog and the page for Reference Books for the Genealogist Wish List, which I compiled in 2011. There were 45 books listed and at that time there were eleven that were still on my wish list. As of today there are only three books on my wish list, plus a few added since then, They are the following:

The Chicago Manual of Style: The Essential Guide for Writers, Editors, and Publishers by Chicago Editorial Staff, 14th Edition, 1993, 933 pgs. (Editions 15 and 16 available online at http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/16/contents.html)


Evidence Explained, Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, Genealogical Publishing Company, 2007, 885 pgs.

The Family Tree Problem Solver: Proven Methods for Scaling the Inevitable Brick Wall, by Marsha Hoffman Rising, 2005, 240 pgs.

You may be wondering how I, a writer, can get along without the first two. The last one was used for a book review I wrote long ago, and is a great read for any genealogist.  This will be the year that I purchase these books. Two other books that came up in our genealogy discussion while picking up the 33 books from the GFO are:

Here, Shall I Die Ashore by Caleb Johnson, about Stephen Hopkins in Bermuda.

Topographical Dictionary of 2885 English Emigrants to New England 1620-1650 by Charles Edward Banks.

What books are on your wish list? Do you have a plan for organizing and setting up a personal library?

Let's just say that I love books. They are treasures and gold mines of information. In moving my access to books locally is not quite the same. While my previous Family History Center had many, our current Family History Center does not. When friends and genealogy societies are downsizing or selling duplicates my arms are open to receive their cast offs. The few duplicates found in my reorganization have been passed on to others. Knowing what you have and books of interest to you will greatly help when you are presented with a list of available books. Happy book hunting.




Sunday, November 1, 2015

Thankful for Family History

Family History is significant to so many people. The three most recent projects to fill my time revealed wonderful connections. Two have Native American roots. Two also have history that occurred very near to our new to us home. It takes hours compiling a family history from online resources, and yet that is only the beginning of understanding those families. Viewing pedigree charts that show five generations of basic information we ponder about the families each of those couples represent. Generations pass away and the descendants represent even more families.

Saturday, September 19, 2015

Celebrating Life and Family Reunions

Today is my mother's 82nd birthday and she has been gone for over two years. So much has happened in those two years that I am still trying to recover. This year we sold her home, bought a new to us home and are in the process of selling our home from before. Each step of the way there is always the thought that I should call my mother as she would enjoy knowing about the changes. My children say she already knows and is keeping track. This spring my mother-in-law passed away, so we adapt once more to having a loved in a better place. The older one becomes the shorter this life seems to be. While children, grandchildren and possibly great grandchildren seem to extend the joy we know, in the end we will all pass on to the better place.

Friday, July 10, 2015

ICAPGen Renewal - My Activities

Tonight there is a new page on this blog, ICAPGen Renewal Report 2015. This is not a perfect submission, but it is something that may help others in report writing. Below is the letter submitted covering my genealogy activities over the last five years. It has been an amazing ride and looking back is helpful in seeing where to go in the future. The serenditpity for me is that this is still something that I have a passion for doing. If you have ever considered applying for accreditation or certification, go for it! In the long run you will be a better genealogist and researcher.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

Selling a House is like Having a Baby

Have you ever been involved in selling a house? We are currently selling our house and earlier this year we sold our mother's home. While this is something that has gone for ages, it always leads to surprise repercussions in the process. You may not have given birth, but there is some common ground in getting pregnant and preparing for a birth. Even with the six births of my children it seems like every time we survived the counting down of  months, days and finally the hours. The anticipation is amazing, but at the final few hours I often wanted just to forget about the birthing process. That is how it feels selling houses, you get almost to the point of exasperation and want to just stop the whole process.

Friday, May 29, 2015

Ruth Chauncey Bishop


Ruth Chauncey Bishop

 In honor of Ruth Chauncey Bishop - 16 April 1945 to 28 May 2015

Her Biographical Sketch updated 2007:

Ruth C. Bishop is an avid genealogist, as well as a friend to the community. She graduated from Pacific University with a B.A. in sociology, and has advanced degrees in computer programming and accounting. While in school she worked for the yearbook, and from that experience her hobby of photography escalated into wedding photographer and other activities. She was very active until 1974, when serious back surgery and the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis slowed her only slightly. Ruth has a great sense of humor and is fun to be with. Her upbeat attitude is an inspiration to all who know her. She has even ridden on elephants and in hot-air balloons!

Monday, May 11, 2015

Celebrating Family

It has been a month since I last wrote a new post and finally the time has come to share in celebrating family and all that it means to me. But first, I must share that an article of mine has been published in the APGQ (Association of Professional Genealogists Quarterly) in the March 2015 issue. It took two years of waiting for just the right moment to send it to Christy Fillerup, who assumed the role of editor of the APGQ sometime last year. She was also in charge of SLIG (Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy) as director for several years. After returning home from SLIG in January and waiting to give her some time to get back on track, the article was sent and I waited to hear from her.